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A* Episode 12 
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I gotta thank Metruis, author of Between Places, yet again for some wonderful art feedback; among the less fundamental but more immediate results, it led me to fix the wacky sinking chair on page 56. Also, while I posted the storyboard sketch and one of the discarded drawings of Selenis for page 46 in an earlier news post, I put the whole screwy drawing process for that page together for the discussion I was having with Metruis; here it is:

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(Notice I drew Selenis like five or six times there. Guh. :"P)

~~~~~~~~~~

Also, been tinkering around some more with the cache control settings for the site, since Firefox 4 seems to be pickier about them than Firefox 3 was; I think it might have been working okay for A* (which is to say, when you visited, it gave you the latest version of the page, not the one your browser had cached when you visited previously), but it was (is?) off for my other comics. And I messed around with the 404 error handling for those comics, which should be more robust now. Whee.


Mon Mar 28, 2011 9:06 pm
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And that is definitely not a robot-mode Valkyrie fighter in the background. That would be silly. >_>


Mon Mar 28, 2011 9:08 pm
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Potentially bad news for the Spirit rover on Mars, which I wrote about a little while back: according to this new AP article, the rover, which got stuck in a Martian sand trap a few years ago, and had to power down as the onset of the Martian winter cut the power its solar panels could generate to a minimal level, has not woken up with the Martian summer solstice this month as controllers had hoped, which may mean it has a more serious problem. In any case, it's very likely that the little rover's Martian journey will be over after 4.8 miles of roaming around, poor thing. Fortunately, it's twin, the Opportunity rover, is still going strong, with 16.6 miles of Martian rock and soil under its treads so far.

Well, to commemorate Spirit, here's a nice panoramic shot it took in its travels on Mars:

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image by NASA (source (larger))

That panorama generated a lot of hubbub, apparently, once some eagle-eyed viewer noticed what could generously be interpreted as a "little green man" in one of the rock formations:

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image by NASA (source (inset))

Tee-hee! There do seem to be some nifty rock formations on Mars, though, like this one called "Home Plate," whose intricate swept shape you can see see in this animation of two Spirit photos:

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images by NASA (source and larger)

Ooh, also check out the video it took of a Martian dust devil!

Spirit and Opportunity have had problems with Martian dust storms blocking their solar panels before--in fact, it is thought that it was brushes with a few friendly dust devils right around the time Spirit took that above-linked video, in March 2005, that cleaned off its panels enough to get it back to a decent power level. And in February and April 2009, winds helped clean dust off the panels and restore power. Judging from those prior incidents, I wonder if it's possible that Spirit's solar panels were buried pretty thoroughly over the last winter, to the point where they can't get any sunlight now in the summer. If that's the cause of the problem, maybe another few dust devils or benevolent wind storms could clear them off.

But it could also be another problem (rover-napped by little green men, for instance!). So, it may be a real Martian sunset for Spirit, like this one it once photographed

Image
image by NASA (source)

--but then again, maybe not! In any case, thanks for the fun, Spirit!


Tue Mar 29, 2011 10:12 pm
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I have two more pages to draw for this episode, which I will hopefully doing today--it will go up to page 67, so let's see...that will take us through next Wednesday. And then if I manage to finish scripting and storyboarding episode 13 in the meanwhile, 13 will start next Thursday--and back to my usual rate of about two pages per day, huzzah!

For now if you need more comics to read, you could check out this past Sunday's page of my weekly fairy tale comic, The Princess and the Giant--just click this handy link banner preview thingy to get there:

Image


Wed Mar 30, 2011 9:39 pm
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Kind of awash in a sea of gray here, ah well.

Hey speaking of seas of gray, the MESSENGER spacecraft now orbiting Mercury has started sending back its first photos of the planet from orbit, and they are pretty neat. Here's the very first, in black and white and then in color:

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image by NASA (source)

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image by NASA (source)

Those are taken by the craft's WAC ("Wide Angle Camera"--the other camera it has is the NAC, "Narrow Angle Camera"), and the color it is capable of is pretty interesting: according to the caption here, the WAC can image in 11 colors, taking one at a time by selectively sampling from a specific wavelength of light with a special filter--for instance, they assign red, green, and blue to wavelengths of 1000 nm, 750 nm, and 430 nm, respectively. Then they combine them together for a full color image, although they "only" use eight of the eleven wavelengths normally.

The crater there is named Debussy, which according to Wikipedia is 85 km in diameter (NASA says it is 80). This AP article about the first photos says that the scientists have been surprised by how many secondary craters are visible on the surface--those are craters not from an initial hit by an asteroid, but by the fragments that initial hit produces--and how big they are: up to 15 miles across, which is "much bigger" than secondary craters on the Moon; one surmise is that this is due to objects moving faster when they hit Mercury, because they're deeper in the Sun's gravitational field--ie, they're falling faster toward the Sun than they are when they're out by us.

Debussy is near Mercury's south polar region, that darker area near the bottom of the photos. Here's a closer shot of Debussy:

Image
image by NASA (source)

(The above three are larger on their source pages; also, kudos to NASA for uploading them as lossless (presumably!) PNG files rather than jpgs. :)

Here's what they call a nice fresh crater, since the rim is still sharp, with little erosion, and it has retained a nice bowl shape, unlike larger craters whose rims tend to collapse under their own weight:

Image
image by NASA (source)

And here are various types of terrain in an area of Mercury's north polar region that hadn't been seen before (neither by Earth-based telescope, nor by Mariner 10 in the 70's):

Image
image by NASA (source)

Image
image by NASA (source)

One of MESSENGER's primary missions will be to look for and study any ices that may survive in the shadowy basins of those polar craters.


~~~~~~~~~~~

Closer to home, my dad has scored me a second art show, this one at the Rosebud Restaurant & Bar in Seattle's ultra-hip Capital Hill district. Neat. We're trucking a bunch of framed and signed prints (of stuff from A*, and my other comics) over there tomorrow for them to hang up, and hopefully I'll be able to get a bit more info on how soon they'll be up (sounded like very soon) and for how long (at least a month). They're the same images we showed at the last show, in Ballard in November-December--minus a few we sold, of course :D--so if you saw them there, you're all caught up already. ;)


Thu Mar 31, 2011 9:34 pm
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Okay I have firmer details about where and when some of my framed and signed art prints--works from A*, and my other comics--are on display here in Seattle, since we hauled them over there today and talked to the owner: they will be up at the Rosebud Restaurant & Bar on Seattle's Capitol Hill from tomorrow (that is, Saturday) through the end of June (three months!). They have nineteen framed pieces from me, including a few that we couldn't fit in the show I had in Ballard in November/December (the wall there wasn't nearly as big as the one they have in Rosebud :o). They were playing background music of which I approve at the Rosebud when I was there today--youngish Sinatra and the like--and they have a bit of class with old movie star posters in their main dining room; also, numerous sleds.

There was some suggestion of some possible sort of function there on the neighborhood's Art Walk day, which is the second Thursday of the month--that would be the 14th of April--but it was a little vague so I will have to get back to you on that. But my stuff should be there starting tomorrow, so if for some reason you want to go hang out with your friends and enjoy some nice food, drinks, pleasant early vocal jazz, and my art, all in one place, you can now do that. Crazy!

~~~~~~~~~

Disaster! Well not really. But I managed to break my beloved Wacom Intuos3 drawing tablet this afternoon by...setting it on the floor; next I tried using it, it kept deactivating and reactivating depending on how I wiggled the USB/power cord where it goes into the tablet, so the wires must've pulled loose or got pinched there or something. Which is a shame because the rest of the tablet is built like a tank. A heavy plastic tank, anyway. Dang.

Exciting! I am getting a fancy new wireless tablet! So I had to go look for a replacement tablet and found that Wacom is now making their fancy-schmancy Intuos4 (that's one whole Intuos more than mine had!) in a wireless version. They are kind of stupid expensive, but it could mean I would never have this cord problem again, so that would make it a little more worth it! And it would be a lot handier to use on my lap, which is what I do with it. Anyway I need something with which to draw comics so I ordered one, and this cute little USB "micro" adapter to go with it.

The soonest Amazon could get them to me is Monday, though, so whereas usually in this end of the week A* news update I would be reminding you that you'll be able to check out a new page of my weekly fairy tale comic, The Princess and the Giant, on Sunday, this time I...won't have one, 'cause I won't have anything to draw with until Monday. Dang.

On the other hand that leaves me more time to finish up the A* episode 13 script for this weekend, since with all this art and breaking stuff, I haven't got it finished yet. The part I've got has been pretty fun, though; Selenis will be in an entirely new environment--socially, anyway--than we've seen her in before, and she'll need to call on different sets of skills to navigate its DEADLY HAZARDS. Okay well actually she's the deadliest part of it, so...it may not end well. For someone. But maybe it will! I haven't written that part just yet. =P

~~~~~~~~

Ooh, almost forgot that I dissected my dead old Intuos3 tablet and took gory pictures of its remains. DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME! Not only did I sort of accidentally rip the foil circuit connecting the circuit board to some kind of vital conducting plate the second time I pried it open, thus definitely killing it off, whereas prior to that it still sort of worked if I held the cord *just so* and didn't breathe, but the third and final time I pried it open, I cut my finger a little on one of the sharp interior edges. ;_;

I bleed for you, Internet! But I got some crummy cell phone photos of the tablet's insides.

Here it is in layers (from right to left): the outer top part you draw on, the main circuit board just below that that does magic stuff, a lovely foam pad, some kind of brushed metal plate, and the plastic bottom

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But where do the elves live?

Here is me failing to get a close-up of the back side of the front panel's buttons

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There don't seem to be any circuits at all going into the drawing surface itself, so I guess it's really just there to support the weight of the stylus, and to feel good in contact with the stylus. The magic must happen below, maybe in this not-very-good photo of the main circuit board

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(but a lovely one of my ancient and irreplaceable brown shag carpet!) You can't really tell from that photo, but those horizontal lines across the middle are all little circuits, just running back and forth behind the part on which you wave the stylus around. And here's a horrible close-up of the rear metal plate; that bronzy foil on the left is the torn ribbon circuit that had connected the metal plate to the circuit board

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I guess it must create some kind of electrical field that the stylus can perturb, and those perturbations are read by the rows of circuits. Or something completely different. Yes I know nothing whatsoever about electronics! Just hope my new one that I will never ever break shows up just when I'm bright-eyed and bushy-tailed to greet the delivery person on Monday so I can start cranking out episode 13 storyboards. =o


Sat Apr 02, 2011 1:52 am
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Looks like my new drawing tablet won't get here until tomorrow :|, so although I finished the script for episode 13, I can't start in on the storyboards yet. According to the script it's going to be a pretty long episode--165 pages or so--so I'd probably need at least three full days to draw that many storyboards, but since I'll now only have two at best before I run out of episode 12 pages (and I still need to finish up the last one, actually :P), this means that I'll probably still have to be drawing storyboards while also starting in on actual episode 13 pages on Thursday, which means (this is the only part that really matters for you the reader) that I probably won't get up to my usual two-pages-per-day speed until some time the following week. Botheration!

So not having a way to draw today, I'm just puttering around doing any non-drawing thing I can think of, like shipping off an art print, proof-reading the script like four more times, uh and I'll probably go dink around with my ads or something later. But I also came up with a pretty fat blog entry topic over the weekend, and so I might as well burn through that today while I can't draw. Here goes then!

Wikipedia's list of nearest stars is pretty neat, and reading through its entries really starts to give an idea of the immense variety of stuff there is out in space, even just around our own quiet little star system! For instance, you may have heard lots of times that the nearest star to us (at just over four light years--could have sworn the figure I was given as a kid was more like 3 ly, but eh I have a bad memory so who knows) is Alpha Centauri--except that Alpha Centauri isn't a star, it's two--and actually maybe even three, since it turns out there's a red dwarf star, Proxima Centauri, that may be gravitationally attached to the two other stars--which are much closer together--making it a triple star system, or "trinary." Just think, the closest star to us, actually a triple! Or at least a double. Makes our single star seem a bit boring by comparison, perhaps.

Of course, we have planets, and they...may not. There's been a lot of controversy of people claiming to have spotted evidence for planets in Alpha Centauri, but for the most part they seem to have been rebuffed for the time being.

But there's more stuff that makes Alpha Centauri pretty interesting. The small Proxima Centauri, just a bit over a tenth of the Sun's mass and diameter, and too faint to be seen with the naked eye, even as close as it is (it's about a tenth of a light year closer than its two larger siblings), sometimes increases in magnitude by up to 8%: it's a very active "flare star," and the flaring activity is thought to be the work of a powerful magnetic field.

Alpha Centauri is headed in our direction, too! Proxima, for instance, is moving toward us at about 21.7 km/s (compare with the Voyager spacecraft's 17 km/s); 26,700 years from now, it is expected to reach its nearest distance to us, 3.11 light years. Alpha Centauri as a whole is projected to vanish from naked-eye view about 100,000 years from now as it moves past us in its orbit around the galaxy.

Here it is--Alpha Centauri A and B, anyway--above the rim of Saturn, as seen by the Cassini spacecraft in 2008:

Image
image by NASA (source)

The second closest star system to Earth, at just under six light years away, is Barnard's Star, another red dwarf, just slightly bigger than the teeny Proxima Centauri. Barnard's is the fastest star moving across our night sky

Image
image by Steve Quirk (source)

and it is moving toward us at about 140 km/s--it will reach its closest point of 3.8 light years in the year 11700, but still won't be visible without a telescope. As with Alpha Centauri, lots of people claimed to have discovered evidence of planets around Barnard's Star, and there was even a starship project intended to go there--Project Daedalus in the '70's--with the hope of reaching it and its supposed planets within 50 years, if the ship could hit a theoretical speed of 12% the speed of light through fusion pulse propulsion utilizing intertial confinement fusion of 50,000 tons of deuterium/helium-3 pellets to propel the 4,000 ton craft on a one-way trip; it wouldn't be able to decelerate and stop at Barnard's Star (you'd need ten times the fuel for that, or something, I think... Well I can't remember, maybe I'm just making that up :P), so 18 sub-probes would have launched between 1.8 and 7.2 years before reaching the star, spreading out with nuclear ion drives to observe the star they'd be speeding by. Oh, and getting enough helium-3 to get there would require 20 years of mining the atmosphere of Jupiter via balloon-supported robotic factories, supposedly.

Fun! Not easy to catch a star, much less a fast one, I suppose. Fast as it is relative to us, Barnard's Star is an ancient one; the furthest estimates (the smallest being more like 7) of a 12 billion year age would make it one of the oldest stars in the galaxy! For a star, being old means, among other things, rotating slower: it takes Barnard's Star 130 days to rotate around its axis, vs just 25 for the young punk Sun. Being that old, it also isn't supposed to have much of a magnetic field anymore, but it threw scientists for a loop in 1998, when it suddenly flared to twice its normal temperature. So finding out how that happened would be one big aim of any exploration of it.

Skipping down the list past a couple more red dwarfs, Wolf 359 and Lalande 21185 (although this nice photo of Wolf 359 gives an idea of what a nearby red dwarf might look like through a telescope)

Image
image by Klaus Hohmann (source)

(Wolf 359 is the red dot in the upper middle of the picture) brings us to another binary: Sirius. I've written about it before on the A* forum, so I'll just quote myself here:

There's a white dwarf pretty much right next to us, just 8.6 light years away: Sirius B, and it in fact is one of those dwarfs that's about the mass of the Sun (0.98 solar masses is close!) and the size of the Earth. It's in a binary with Sirius A, which is about two solar masses, and the brightest star in our sky--after the Sun. Here you can see little B and big A; the B dwarf is the little white dot to the lower left of the big A glare:

Image
image from NASA (source)


White dwarfs and their "degenerate matter" are pretty awesome, but I'll limit myself to just dropping those links on you for now. :)

Skipping down the list again past four more red dwarf flare stars (the binary Luyten 726-8, then Ross 154 and Ross 248 (Voyager 2 will come within 1.76 light years of Ross 248 in 40,176 years!)), I'll just dwell last on Epsilon Eridani (which will come within a light year of Luyten 726-8 around AD 33500, possibly knocking some comets off or something!), ninth in the distance list at ten and a half light years from Earth.

Epsilon Eridani has extensive disks of debris around it, and has the firmest candidates for an extrasolar planet or two close to Earth, although they're still debated and theoretical, respectively. Epsilon Eridani is all the more exciting to those who like to try to discover planets because it's a "sunlike" star, which is to say that it's not radically different than the Sun in terms of mass, size, and brightness: 82%, 74%, and 34%, respectively. But its magnetic field is stronger than the Sun's, and that's one indicator that has scientists thinking its a relatively young star: maybe between 0.5 and 1 billion years old, for instance (the Sun is about 4.5 billion years old).

While the presence of planets around Epsilon Eridani is hotly debated, the presence of an outer dust disk around it can be pretty firmly proven based on strong infrared readings from the system, and what we can project from that is pretty interesting in its own right. The dust disk seems to have about one-sixth of the mass of the Moon in it, and maybe 5 to 9 Earth masses worth of comets; it is also thought that it would have taken collisions between about eleven Earth masses-worth of "parent bodies" to generate all that stuff. Furthermore, a 2008 study of data from the Spitzer Space Telescope (which sees in the infrared) determined that there are two asteroid belts inside the cometary disk, and that two-belts-plus-disk structure suggests the presence of "more than two planets" to be herding that material into its current configuration.

All that within just ten and a half light years from Earth! (And this isn't counting any Earth or smaller planets that might be there since we can't really spot those with current technology.) And the galaxy is 10,000 times wider than that! And there are maybe more than 170 billion galaxies within just the part of the universe we can see!

... That's gonna be a lot of blog entries. :o


Mon Apr 04, 2011 9:46 pm
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My new tablet has been "Out For Delivery" here in Seattle since 4:17 A.M., according to UPS's tracking info that I have been refreshing obsessively since 7:20 A.M. WHYYYYYY ISN'T IT HEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEERE GAHHHHHH


Tue Apr 05, 2011 11:34 am
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They must've been watching my forum because it came, yay! :D


Tue Apr 05, 2011 12:09 pm
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My new tablet came! Yay! So I can finish the last page of episode 12 for tomorrow (I started it last week but put it off because I wanted to start on the script for episode 13), and start on the 165 or so storyboards I'll need for the next episode. There's no way I'll get close to having them done by the time I have to start drawing episode 13 pages for you on Thursday, though, so for the next I don't know maybe four or so days there I'll have to be spending half the day drawing just one new episode 13 page to give you, then churning through as many storyboards as I can.

I should have started on them earlier today (the tablet arrived at about noon; I'd been up since 7:20 AM refreshing their tracking page, which had just shown "out for delivery" since 4:17 AM :P), but I got caught up in trying to configure the new tablet. It's an Intuos4 Wireless, which sounded neat since it was the dumb USB data/power cord that I'd busted on my Intuos3 last week, but it doesn't look like I'll be using the wireless mode for drawing. Here's why:

Image

and by "best possible connection" I mean that when I drew them, I was sitting with the tablet just a few feet away from the IOGEAR GBU421 Bluetooth 2.1 USB Micro Adapter so that the connection strength looked like this in WinXP's readout:

Image

and that didn't actually seem to matter a whole lot, anyway; you get pretty much the same results with everything below that until you're down to like just a few pixels of signal, at which point the lines get really polygonal and there's noticeable lag on the pointer--but it's kind of hard to get reception that bad without being twenty feet or more from the adapter.

Anyhoo, since I like my lasso'd drawings as smooth as possible, I'll have to stick to keeping the tablet plugged in while drawing comics. It's a little remarkable that I didn't see this loss of smoothness or update rate or whatever it is when going from USB to wireless reported by any of the user reviews I read on Amazon (I did see one or two complaining about laggy response, but that can only mean they either had really bad adapters or just weren't getting good reception on them), but I suppose if you're using a drawing tool that supports smoothing--which pretty much all of them do in modern drawing programs--and maybe not drawing very fast, you wouldn't notice the loss of input detail much, if at all. But my crotchety ol' unsmoothed Photoshop 4 lasso is sensitive enough to pick it up, consarn it! (I don't know what that means.)

~~~~~~~~

After drawing the circles above, I thought well maybe the regular Windows XP SP2 Bluetooth "stack" would be better with the jaggies than the one that comes with the driver from IOGEAR's site (this did of course sound unlikely, but IOGEAR's flimsy documentation even sort of confusedly directed XP SP2 users to stick with the ("much more limited" or something) Windows stack rather than bothering with the driver they provided on mini-CD in the adapter's packaging), so I tried switching back to the Windows Bluetooth driver. This turned out to be a huge mistake: two blue screens, innumerable Windows-didn't-manage-to-shut-down-or-boot-up-right fun times, fairly hopeless searches finding hopeless internet postings with vaguely similar problems (which didn't land me much aside from a fairly mild Firefox browser virus ;p), and the Windows driver not seeming to be capable of detecting the darn tablet at all, I finally got back to what seems to be the best I can manage reinstall of the IOGEAR driver, although there are still worrying traces of the Windows stuff lingering around somehow, and the tablet seems less inclined than it was before to complete a handshake via the IOGEAR driver's System Tray icon (but it'll do it just fine by way of the Mouse control panel--huhhhh)...but anyway it works again, and is back to drawing slightly flattish circles just like it did before, so I guess it's all right. (I should probably mention that IOGEAR doesn't actually make their own driver, they just give you the one from the manufacturer of the actual chip inside the adapter, which is Broadcom or something like that.)

~~~~~~~~~

You know, Wacom didn't bother to mention that the fancy illuminated names of the customizable buttons on the Intuos4 Wireless don't illuminate if you have the tablet in wireless mode, which seems downright un-neighborly.

Anyway non-Wacom-specific Bluetooth headaches aside, it's a pretty nice tablet; it can't really be worth anywhere near what Wacom charges for it (I think it cost more than my friggin' computer; it certainly costs more than my previous tablets, whereas technology across the rest of the computer industry usually gets *less* expensive with time, rather than more), but that's what they get for having come out with a monopoly of the market, I suppose. Anyway, since the USB cable on this Wireless version is completely detachable, if I do manage to screw it up somehow like I did with the Intuos3, at least I'll be able to replace just the generic cable, rather than having to get a whole new tablet.

~~~~~~~~~

So I don't like the loss of detail the wireless brings for drawing, but I have found one really handy use for the tablet in wireless mode: as an oversized remote control for Pandora; you can bind Pandora's keyboard shortcuts to the Intuos4's numerous customizable buttons, and then you no longer need endure the pain of Pandora deciding to experiment by feeding you a bunch of tracks totally unlike the ones you've told it you like, just as soon as you've settled yourself down at something in the next room. Hah! I have you now, Pandora. (Seriously though, being able to give a thumbs-down to crappy songs from the next room feels so, so good.)

~~~~~~~~

UPDATE: Ah, setting the Bluetooth adapter back to "discoverable" seems to let the tablet connect by itself so I don't have to do it manually, and also solved the "no fancy illuminated names in wireless mode" problem I'd given myself. This is good.

Despite full virus scans with multiple programs, cleaning out everything I could think of, uninstalling Java, etc, after hours of seemingly being "clean," I just got another seemingly randomly-timed pop-up tab in Firefox 4. This is bad. ;P


Tue Apr 05, 2011 9:25 pm
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