comic | episodes & e-books | store | about | forum 




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 148 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 11, 12, 13, 14, 15  Next
A* Episode 29 
Author Message
User avatar

Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2009 4:18 pm
Posts: 4371
    
Added 1 new A* page:
Bah, painting! I'm going to bed, I'm not even gonna cross-post this comic to all the various places I usually cross-post 'em, I'll just hafta do that in the morning. = P


Mon Sep 19, 2016 11:35 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2009 4:18 pm
Posts: 4371
    
Added 1 new A* page:
Space news has piled up on me a little bit so it's time for....space news roundup!

- Watch the launch of an asymmetric rocket (Ars Technica) - An Atlas V rocket only needed one strap-on booster to lift a satellite into orbit, and to compensate for the booster's one-sided weight, it had to gimbal (ie, pivot) its main thruster sideways a tad; an interesting launch style you don't see often!

- Gaia space telescope plots a billion stars (BBC) - The first load of data is back from the ESA's Gaia space telescope, giving the position and brightness of over a billion stars (or other sources of light) in unprecedented detail--so ground-breaking is Gaia's vision that 400 million of those objects had never been catalogued before. For 2 million of the objects, by comparing Gaia's readings with readings from its predecessor, Hipparcos (ESA), scientists were able to determine their distance and sideways motion; this type of information, combined with analysis of radial velocity (movement of stars as they turn toward or away from Gaia as they rotate around the galaxy), will allow scientists to construct a much more precise map of the galaxy, and one that includes where stars are going and where, by projecting their motion backwards, they came from, ie how the galaxy evolved. There is so much data that they have made it available on the web so the public can help sift through it. Gaia's 2 million object catalogue is already twice as precise and 20 times as big as Hipparcos', which has been the definitive reference catalogue for the past 20 years. Gaia's mission goal is to plot 1 billion objects fully--but interestingly, the satellite has found that there are more faint stars out there than had been previously thought, so its full catalogue--approximately yearly data updates are anticipated, with a little over two years left in its original mission duration--may end up consisting of 2-3 billion objects. (I wonder if these newly discovered faint stars account for any of the so-called "dark matter"?)

- China launches second trial space station (BBC) - China has put the Tiangong-2 space station into orbit; it follows a smaller test station, Tiangong-1, which went up in 2011 (and is expected to burn up in the atmosphere some time late next year). "Heavenly Palace 2" is 15 meters long, and will host two astronauts for a month, beginning in October. Tiangong-3, due to launch in 2022, will be 18.1 meters long, a full size prototype for the core module of an eventual modular space station.


Tue Sep 20, 2016 10:49 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2009 4:18 pm
Posts: 4371
    
Added 1 new A* page:
Here's an ink sketch I sent to a reader for supporting the comic through my Patreon campaign : ) :

Image

Thank you very much! ^_^


Wed Sep 21, 2016 10:18 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2009 4:18 pm
Posts: 4371
    
Added 1 new A* page:
I got back to the Phinney Center Gallery (6532 Phinney Ave N, Seattle, top floor (map)) to snap a few shots of the art installation they did for my art show with fellow Seattle artist Jessica Keteyian:

Image

Image

Image

Pretty snazzy set-up they have there! There's a bunch more art in there hidden behind those fancy mobile display walls of theirs, and you'll just have to get down to the gallery to find it all. The show runs through the 30th, so you've got one more week to catch it!


Thu Sep 22, 2016 10:43 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Thu Nov 18, 2010 11:51 am
Posts: 247
    
... I think that may be the most ...genuine smile.. Selenis has EVER had!


Thu Sep 22, 2016 11:21 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2009 4:18 pm
Posts: 4371
    
sunphoenix wrote:
... I think that may be the most ...genuine smile.. Selenis has EVER had!

: ))


Fri Sep 23, 2016 7:19 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2009 4:18 pm
Posts: 4371
    
Added 1 new A* page:
Here's a sketch I got to send to a reader for supporting the comic through my Patreon campaign : ) :

Image

Thanks to everyone helping me out through Patreon! Even just a buck or two a month makes a big difference. : D


Sat Sep 24, 2016 8:24 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2009 4:18 pm
Posts: 4371
    
Added 1 new A* page:
If you're in the monthly e-book reward group of supporters contributing to my Patreon campaign, and you *haven't* been getting an A* e-book download link from me in your email inbox each month, please let me know! (Unless I've already sent them all to you, in which case we'll just have to wait for a month in which I've made a brand new one. : ) One reader wasn't receiving the emails in some months for some reason we haven't quite pinned down yet; hopefully it wasn't something affecting anyone else, but if you haven't been getting those mails from me, hit me back (smbhax@gmail.com) and I'll get you caught up.


Mon Sep 26, 2016 11:55 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2009 4:18 pm
Posts: 4371
    
Added 1 new A* page:
A mini space news roundup!

- China's colossal radio telescope begins testing (BBC) - There's an impressive photo of the completed giant dish in this article--the thing is 500 meters across! : o It will "take three years to calibrate." (The next largest dish, in Puerto Rico, is a "mere" 305m.)

- Europa moon 'spewing water jets' (BBC) - Scientists used Hubble to spot spectroscopic readings of excess hydrogen and oxygen, suggestive of water spewing into space from Jupiter's moon Europa, back in 2013; Europa is thought to have a massive ocean beneath a maybe tens of kilometers thick ice crust. Now, scientists have used Hubble to look for water coming from Europa again, but this time observing the rim of the moon in ultraviolet light as it passed in front of Jupiter, and in ultraviolet they seemed to see "dark fingers" extending from the edge of the moon, in about the same area as the 2013 spectroscopic readings. These "fingers," then, are likely to be plumes of water ice, "several hundred kilometres in height," and quite possibly similar to ice plumes clearly photographed on Saturn's moon Enceladus. Europa's plumes appear to be sporadic, and the reason for that is as yet unexplained.


Tue Sep 27, 2016 9:53 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2009 4:18 pm
Posts: 4371
    
Added 1 new A* page:
It got late so now I'm just going to bed. : D


Wed Sep 28, 2016 11:49 pm
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 148 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 11, 12, 13, 14, 15  Next


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group.
Modified from the "Hestia" theme designed by Vjacheslav Trushkin.